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What happened to singing and dancing?

05 Nov

The Back of the Napkin: Solving Problems and Selling Ideas with Pictures

The Back of the Napkin: Solving Problems and Selling Ideas with Pictures


“Walk into a kindergarten class and (with teacher’s permission) ask for a show of hands on how many of the six-year-olds can sing. Every hand will go up in the air. How many can dance? Every hand. How many can draw? Every hand. Now ask how many can read: a couple hands might rise. Then walk into a tenth-grade classroom and ask the sixteen-year-olds the same questions: How many can sing? One or two hands. How many can dance? A few. How many can draw? A couple. Now ask how many can read. Every hand will go up.

Don’t get me wrong: There’s certainly nothing wrong with learning to read. But what happened to singing, dancing, and drawing? Once we believed that we knew how to do those things — in fact, at kindergarten age most of us practiced them happily every day — so why, ten years later, do so many of us forget what we once knew? And by forgetting (or even just thinking we’ve forgotten), are we missing something fundamental in our innate problem-solving abilities that could be useful to us in the black-and-white, right-and-wrong, quantitative world of business?”

The words of Dan Roam from the pages 237-238 of his book ‘The Back of the Napkin: Solving Problems and Selling Ideas with Pictures‘ seems to be a pure gem, a kind of alarm-bell, question-raising on children raising and brain-teasing for finding better ways to education, all at the same time and to utmost degree. I will remember those words for a long time and make people pay more attention to the ideas and questions hidden in those two short paragraphs.

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Posted by on November 5, 2008 in business, CogSci, General, psychology

 

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