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NLP Links of The Day

24 Jun

Using The Wisdom Of Crowds To Translate Language: “There are aspects to the translation problem that are undeniably, unavoidably human,” says Philip Resnik, who teaches linguistics at the University of Maryland. Resnik says computer translators like Babelfish and Google Translate work best when they have lots of translation data to learn from. And we only have that data for a handful of languages, like French and Chinese. “There’s an awful lot more than six languages in the world,” Resnik says. “And an awful lot of people in the world who have a need for something that provides more reliability than you’re going to get from Google Translate.”

Language analysis tool to ascertain age and gender: Computer scientists at Lancaster University have been working on a tool that can work out a person’s age and gender using language analysis techniques. They hope it will eventually be used to help police and law enforcement agencies spot when an adult in a chat room is masquerading as a child as part of the victim ‘grooming’ process.

Blogs and tweets could predict the future: In the time it takes you to read this sentence, more than a thousand tweets will have been twittered and dozens of blogs posted. Much of their content will be ephemeral fluff: personal gripes and tittle-tattle interesting to no one but the parties concerned. Yet despite this, it is possible to use that torrent of information to make predictions about social and economic trends that affect us all.

Are Your Texts Depressed? The Computer Knows, Maybe: Software may know when you are depressed by examining your online behavior. Researchers at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, in Beer-Sheva, Israel, have developed a program that can detect depression in online texts and could serve as a screening tool to direct potential patients towards treatment. Psychologists caution, however, that it hasn’t actually been tested on real people.

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Posted by on June 24, 2010 in Linguistics, Programlama

 

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