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Tag Archives: AI

Generative Deep Learning and Bach, a Good Fit?


If you’re like me, you know that there’s never “enough Bach” in one’s life and you can always tap into infinite musical curiosities based on Bach. Using Artificial Intelligence methods such as deep learning to “train” computers for music composition is one of the fascinating recent trends in this area, and applying these automated, statistical methods to Bach chorales is an active topic of research with interesting results. The book by David Foster, “Generative Deep Learning – Teaching Machines to Paint, Write, Compose, and Play“, has a chapter dedicated to using generative deep learning methods such as MuseGAN for music composition, and explains how such “generative” models can be trained on Bach’s real polyphonic compositions to output new musical pieces in the style of Bach.

Below is an original piece created by the Generative Adversarial Deep Learning Network (GAN, in particular the famous MuseGAN network architecture). The MuseGAN deep learning network system was able to create this after training for only 1000 epochs on a moderate laptop for 2 hours (without using GPUs), based on the data set at https://github.com/czhuang/JSB-Chorales-dataset (a set of 229 Bach chorales). In other words, this is definitely not representative of what Deep Learning can achieve as best because such a system can be easily trained for longer on much more powerful systems (see further examples below). The focus of these examples is the fact that you can also start to experiment with deep learning systems that start to model musical aspects without explicit musical teaching, hard-encoded rules in software, etc.

You can click on the image below to visit SoundCloud and listen to MP3 file generated by MuseScore.

Example created by the GAN by randomly applying nornally distributed noise vectors - Click to listen on SoundCloud

Example created by MuseGAN by randomly applying normally distributed noise vectors – Click to listen on SoundCloud

Among the actual Bach chorales in the data set, the “closest” one to the artificially generated example (“close” in the sense of Euclidean distance) can be seen below. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on December 17, 2019 in Math, Music, Programlama

 

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What was the state of AI in Europe almost 70 years ago?


When it comes to the history of Artificial Intelligence (AI), even a simple Internet search will tell you that the defining event was “The Dartmouth Summer Research Project on Artificial Intelligence“, a summer workshop in 1956, held in Dartmouth College, United States. What is less known is the fact that, 5 years before Dartmouth, USA, there was a conference in Europe, back in 1951. The conference in Paris was “Les machines à calculer et la pensée humaine” (Calculating machines and human thinking). This can be easily considered the earliest major conference on Artificial Intelligence. Supported by the Rockefeller foundation, its participant list included the intellectual giants of the field, such as Warren Sturgis McCulloch, Norbert Wiener, Maurice Vincent Wilkes, and others.

The organizer of the conference, Louis Couffignal, was also mathematician and cybernetics pioneer, who had already published a book titled “Les machines à calculer. Leurs principes. Leur évolution.” in 1933 (Calculating machines. Their principles. Their evolution.) Another highlight from the conference was El Ajedrecista (The Chess Player), designed by Spanish civil engineer and mathematician Leonardo Torres y Quevedo. There was also a presentation based on practical experiences with the Z4 computer, designed by Konrad Zuse, and operated in ETH Zurich. The presenter was none other than Eduard Stiefel, inventor of the conjugate gradient method, among other things.

The field of AI has come a long way since 1951, and it is safe to say it’s going to penetrate into more aspects of our lives and technologies. It’s also safe to say that like many technological and scientific endeavors, progress in AI is the result of many bright minds in many different countries, and generally USA and UK are regarded as the places that contributed a lot. But it’s also important to recognize the lesser known facts such as this Paris conference in 1951, and realize the strong tradition in Europe: not only the academic, research and development track, but also the strong industrial and business tracks. Historical artifacts in languages other than English necessarily mean less recognition, but they should be a reason to cherish the diversity and variety. I believe all of these aspects combined should guide Europe in its quest for advancing the state of the art in AI, both in terms of software, hardware, and combined systems.

This article is heavily based on and inspired by the following article by Herbert Bruderer, a retired lecturer in didactics of computer science at ETH Zürich: “The Birthplace of Artificial Intelligence?

 
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Posted by on July 11, 2019 in Math, Programlama, Science

 

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Lost in Google Translate: How Unreasonable Effectiveness of Data can Sometimes Lead Us Astray


I’ve recently received an e-mail in Dutch from the Belgian teacher of my 7.5-year-old son, and even though my Dutch is more than enough to understand what his teacher wrote, I also wanted to check it with Google Translate out of habit and because of my professional/academic background. This led to an interesting discovery and made me think once again about artificial intelligence, deep learning, automatic translation, statistical natural language processing, knowledge representation, commonsense reasoning and linguistics.

But first things first, let’s see how Google Translate translated a very ordinary Dutch sentence into English:

Interesting! It is obvious that my son’s teacher didn’t have anything to do with a grinding table (!), and even if he did, I don’t think he’d involve his class with such interesting hobbies. 🙂 Of course, he meant the “multiplication table for 3”.

Then I wanted to see what the giant search engine, Google Search itself knows about Dutch word of “maaltafel”. And I’ve immediately seen that Google Search knows very well that “maaltafel” in Dutch means “Multiplication table” in English. Not only that, but also in the first page of search results, you can see the expected Dutch expression occurring 47 times. Nothing surprising here: Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on February 8, 2019 in CogSci, Linguistics, philosophy, Science

 

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